Ferrari will be putting CarPlay in the FF

In-vehicle technology plays huge roll in purchase decisions

According to Forrester Consumer’s survey data, more than 50% of North Americans that plan to buy a new vehicle in the next 12 months will base their purchase decision partly on the onboard technology options in a certain vehicle.

That means a lot, and could be a large reason why Apple has decided to jump into the in-vehicle infotainment industry with their new CarPlay interface.

Automotive Industry analysts from ABIY Research believe that Apple’s new user interface could  very well dominate the new-vehicle industry by 2018 simply because Apple has such a large share of the smart-phone market.

“Apple’s conservative approach will get it into many cars faster than competitors, who will likely end up supporting Apple’s CarPlay while they aim for deeper built-in technology,” Gillett added.

Gillett says that Apple’s strategy is focused on enabling infotainment and telematics compatibility, rather than trying to completely replace the in-vehicle operating systems like Blackberry is trying to do with it’s QNX technology, or Google’s sponsored Open Automotive Alliance, or even Microsoft’s embedded technology.

Questions are rising about whether or not Apple would allow other software on a vehicle’s infotainment system. According to Koslowski, Apple always “want to be standalone. Android is probably much more open to this.”

Concept of the new Apple CarPlay in a Hona Civic

How many vehicles will have Apple CarPlay?

According to market research from the large and popular automotive research company IHS Automotive, somewhere around 215,000 vehicles will be built in 2014 with Apple’s new CarPlay integrated and supported.

While that may not seem much, its a start – IHS projects that by 2020, around 25 million CarPlay enabled vehicle infotainment systems will have been sold with CarPlay – and that’s only estimating a 25% market share of the vehicles being sold by that date.

“So there’s significant growth, but 25 million units is still only 25% of the cars that will be sold, so it’s not reaching critical mass even by the end of this decade,” Mark Boyadjis, manager of Infotainment & HMI systems at IHS Automotive said.

IHS feels that automakers that have committed to rolling out CarPlay this year will likely test the waters on only one of their vehicle models. Manufacturers have to keep in mind that there are plenty of people with non-Apple phones that they also have to be inclusive of.  That means car companies will have to allow mobile software developers to have a large say in what the vehicle’s infotainment system can and should do.

Original reports were that CarPlay would only support iPhone 5 and newer, and some called it a ‘snub’ to Apple’s customer base. Since then, Apple has released an updated iOS7.1 that supports CarPlay, and works on the 4, 4s and newer iPhone models.

Tesla not listed as one of Apple CarPlay's partners

Apple’s CarPlay lineup has host of automakers – but no Tesla

Following the early March announcement of Apple’s CarPlay system, the first question people have is what vehicles will the system be available in?

As time goes on, Apple is announcing more and more partnerships, but one automotive manufacturing company is noticeably absent.

Tesla Motors, which has been making big waves in the news recently due to high sale numbers and a few vehicle fires, is not listed in Apple’s list of CarPlay current partners, or future ‘committed partners’.

Tesla is not commenting on Apple’s CarPlay at this time – Tesla Spokesman

This is even stranger after the recent splurge of news articles announcing a possible secret conversation that may or may not have taken place between Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Apple’s Acquisitions and mergers chief Adrian Perica last spring.

What can we make of all of this? No one really knows, and since CarPlay hasn’t hit the streets in any vehicles yet, perhaps nothing needs to be made of it – yet.